This Week in Asia: Social Commentary Around Singapore’s Domestic Workers Reply

Mums and Maids, a YouTube video generating some debate on this tropical isle, perhaps deserves more credit than local media coverage and public discussion currently grants.  Some have taken exception to the video’s portrait of maids who know children better than the parents in this video.  The argument is that parents might spend more time with the kids, thereby allowing domestic workers to have a day of.

And that is the point of the video–giving maids a day of rest.  #igiveadayoff

But perhaps something more important is happening here.  In a country where public bodies create messages about understanding dementia (Ah Kong), showing tolerance (or understanding) of people from different nations and cultures, and even arrange public networking for singles seeking a partner….to see a message like this coming from an NGO is important.

The fact that this public conversation has been sparked by a workers’ rights group, Transient Workers Count Too, represents an important act of participating in a  civil society.  This is a more sophisticated act of public discourse compared to the blunt stridence communicated by opposition parties or the “move to the centre of the train” messages facing commuters each day.  Both are important, so please do not mistake my point, but many of these messages fail to generate genuine public discourse around the issue.

#igiveadayoff has generated such discourse, and they should be credited for their civic contribution regardless of which side of the issue you may fall.

This Week in Asia: China Mounts a Canon Atop Its Great Firewall Reply

This week I share 3 items that may interest my APAC readers.

  1. China adds a new weapon to its web control arsenal.  While many links are available, this one is courtesy of Fortune.
  2. Hank Paulson’s new book, Dealing with China, is receiving favourable comments from may China watchers.  I wonder if the timing of this book makes him a possible candidate for a VP nomination or embassy nominee?  hmmm
  3. A few weeks ago We Are Social released a huge report on digital APAC and it is worth a look (especially if you are a data junkie, like me).

Click below to listen, and as always do subscribe to For Immediate Release over at iTunes.

The Connection Between Facebook and Unhappiness — Science of Us Reply

Need a good reason to ignore your friends’ fake-ation photos?  Continue reading to learn how these photos, at least in part, resonate through one popular social network.

The authors write, “Both studies provide evidence that people feel depressed after spending a great deal of time on Facebook because they feel badly when comparing themselves to others.” The researchers also tested the reverse idea — that depressed people spend more time on Facebook, are more likely to make social comparisons, and therefore see worse outcomes — but didn’t find much statistical support for this idea. So overall, it seems to be the case that Facebook generates a stream of endless opportunities to compare ourselves to our peers — via their vacation and spouse pictures, their employment updates, and so on — and these comparisons stress us out and depress us.

via The Connection Between Facebook and Unhappiness — Science of Us.